CfP: Psychology of the Fairy Tale/Fairyland Fiction, MLA Panel

Psychology of the Fairy Tale/Fairyland Fiction

deadline for submissions:
February 28, 2017

full name / name of organization:
MLA

contact email:
padmini.sukumaran@gmail.com

Papers examining the fairy tale/fairyland fiction through a psychoanalytic lens are invited. Please submit 250 word abstracts to padmini.sukumaran@gmail.com by February 28, 2107.

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Hotel Information

Hello ICFA 38 Attendees!

We look forward to another exciting conference, and, as the Marriott has filled to capacity again this year, we have every expectation of a successful event!

In the event that you missed the deadline for the Marriott, we have secured a few rooms at the Sheraton next door. Please contact Jeri Zulli at jerzulli@live.com in the next week if you would like to book a room at the Sheraton.

If anyone has a last minute change of plans and needs to cancel a room at the Marriott, please contact us instead of the hotel, so we can pass it on to another attendee who is hoping for a room. (Cancellations with the hotel directly will no longer return that room to IAFA’s room block.)

Thanks

Jeri Zulli
jerzulli@live.com

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Call for Plays for The 2017 ICFA FLASH PLAY Festival

Announcing: The Return of the Flash Play Festival!

One Night Only—Friday, March 24
9:45-10:45 p.m.

In the festive Capri Room of the Orlando Airport Marriott

Hosted by Marco Palmieri
Directed by Carrie J. Cole and Kelli Shermeyer
Written and performed by some of your favorite academics, authors, and editors

Your challenge is to write a ten-minute play (roughly ten pages of dialogue) which MUST INCLUDE THE FOLLOWING:
No more than THREE performers
One of THREE props—(a BAT, a MECHANICAL ARM, a CURSED MAP)
The following line:
“I think we can agree this did NOT go as planned.”

Deadline for submission: WEDNESDAY, 3/1. Send your plays (and any questions you may have) to carriejcole@gmail.com with the subject line “ICFA Flash Play Festival”.

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CfP: HP Lovecraft

The international peer-reviewed journal Abusões, based at the State University of Rio de Janeiro, has issued the following cfp:
http://www.e-publicacoes.uerj.br/index.php/abusoes/

Howard Philips Lovecraft is one of the most influential writers in horror, science fiction, fantasy, or as the author himself put it, “Weird Fiction” from the first half of the twentieth century. The importance of his oeuvre becomes evident through the amount of significant artists whose work have somehow been inspired by Lovecraft’s (Stephen King, Clive Barker, Ridley Scott, Guillermo Del Toro, John Carpenter, Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, and H. R. Giger, to mention a few), as well as by the pervasive presence of his creations in contemporary pop culture. As a tribute to the 80thanniversary of Lovecraft’s death and to the centennial of one of his most emblematic stories, Dagon, the fourth issue of Abusões Magazine expects submissions on: (1) Lovecraft’s production as an artist and as a critic, (2) Cosmic Horror (both within and without Lovecraft’s oeuvre), and (3) comparatist analyses of fictional works and essays which establish a dialogue with the Lovecraftian oeuvre. Submissions are due March 5, 2017.

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2017 Crawford Award Announced

2017 Crawford Award Announced

The winner of the 2017 Crawford Award, presented annually by the International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts for a first book of fantasy, is Charlie Jane Anders for All the Birds in the Sky (Tor). One judge cited the novel’s “humor, the light touch, the swiftness with which the narrative unspools.”

The other books included on this year’s Crawford shortlist include Maria Turtschaninoff’s novel Maresi (Pushkin/Abrams), Rose Lemberg’s poetry collection Marginalia to Stone Bird (Aqueduct), and Michael Wehunt’s story collection Greener Pastures (Shock Totem).
Participating at various stages of this year’s nomination and selection process were previous Crawford winners Jedediah Berry, Daryl Gregory, and Candas Jane Dorsey, as well as Cheryl Morgan, Niall Harrison, Farah Mendlesohn, Ellen Klages, Graham Sleight, Karen Burnham, and Liza Groen Trombi. The award will be presented on March 19 during the 38th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts in Orlando, Florida.

Also at the conference, the IAFA’s Distinguished Scholarship Award will be presented to Edward James, and the Jamie Bishop Memorial Award for a work of scholarship written in a language other than English will go to David Dalton. The Walter James Miller Memorial Award, for a student paper on a work or works of the fantastic originally created in a language other than English, will be presented to Ida Yoshinaga.

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SCIAFA Writing Workshop

Ladies and Gentlemen,

I would like to take this opportunity to remind you all that the deadline to apply for the SCIAFA Writing Workshop is coming up on Friday, Feb 10th. The Writing Workshop is a wonderful opportunity to work with a professional to improve your writing and prepare for publication. Here again is the information about the workshop and the particulars for applying:

One of the main events sponsored by the IAFA Student Caucus is the SCIAFA Writing Workshop that takes place during ICFA. It is a chance for graduate students to share their written work with a professional in the field and receive invaluable feedback and advice as they work to improve their writing and shift from conference papers to publications. In the past, this workshop has been run by such people as Sherryl Vint, Ritch Calvin, and Brian Attebery. This year we are pleased to announce that the workshop will be run by Christine Mains.

Christine Mains has taught SF, Fantasy, and popular culture at the University of Calgary and Mount Royal University. She is a past Vice President of the International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts and is currently an Associate Editor for Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts. She has published on SF television and on the works of Patricia McKillip and Charles de Lint. She moonlights as a freelance editor of fiction and academic writing.

The workshop will focus on issues to consider when revising conference papers or dissertation chapters into articles that might be submitted to JFA or other journals. The workshop is capped at 10 participants. It will be held in the last time-slot of the conference: Saturday, March 25, from 4-5:30pm. To apply for the workshop, please submit a two-page writing sample and the following information no later than Friday, February 10.

-your name
-your preferred email address
-your institutional affiliation and adviser
-what stage you’re at in your program
-your dissertation or thesis topic (1-2 sentences)
-the issues or problems in your writing you’d most like to address (1-2 sentences)
-the title(s) of academic journals you’re most interested in submitting to

Submissions should be sent to cemains@shaw.ca

Prior to the workshop, participants will need to send their full paper submissions (~5000 words) no later than March 10. They will also need to bring two copies of the paper to the workshop for peer review.

Any questions may be addressed to both Christine Mains at cemains@shaw.ca and Amanda Rudd at rudd.am@gmail.com


Amanda Rudd
PhD Candidate in English and American Literature
University of Houston

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ICFA 38 Mentors Needed

Ladies and Gentlemen,

As we get closer to ICFA 38, I would like to take this opportunity to ask you to consider being a mentor for the Mentorship Program sponsored by the SCIAFA. At this time we have far more mentees signed up for the program than mentors. If you have attended ICFA before, and wish to help newcomers to the conference, I encourage you to sign up to be a mentor.

Please find the full details about the mentorship program below:

SCIAFA Mentoring Program

Since 2001, the IAFA Student Caucus (SCIAFA) has sponsored a Mentoring Program aimed at helping student scholars to find their way around ICFA, discover the natural friendliness of the conference as quickly as possible, use ICFA as an entrance into existing scholarly communities concerned with the fantastic, and leave with both fond memories of the supporting organization and plans to return.
The success of this program depends upon its volunteer participants, and this is your chance to sign up as either a mentor or mentee. IAFA and SCIAFA will be co-sponsoring a designated space where mentors and mentees can meet at the opening Conference Reception on Wednesday evening, March 22, 2016. Attendance at this meeting is the primary task to be undertaken by both mentor and mentee. If you would like to take part in the program in either role but are unable to attend the opening reception, we encourage you to sign up anyway and arrange a more convenient meeting time with your partner. The current SCIAFA representatives will match the mentor-mentee pairs. For this reason, if you interested in joining this program, please answer the following questions and send them to the SCIAFA representatives, Amanda Rudd (rudd.am@gmail.com) and Sarah Fish (srfish36@gmail.com), as soon as possible. Please fill out this information in order to sign up for either position.

1. What is your name?
2. What is your e-mail address?
3. What is your institutional affiliation?
4. What would you consider to be your main interests in the field of the fantastic?
5. When will you be arriving at the conference?
6. When will you be departing from the conference?
7. Are you currently planning to attend the conference reception on Wednesday evening? (*Last year we had a large number of mentees say “yes” and not show up, which creates embarrassments. Please inform us if your plans change and make every effort to follow through with whatever you commit.)
8. Which role are you signing up for, mentor or mentee?


Amanda Rudd
PhD Candidate in English and American Literature
University of Houston

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CfP: Speculative Vegetation: Plants in Science Fiction

Speculative Vegetation: Plants in Science Fiction

deadline for submissions:
April 30, 2017

full name / name of organization:
Katherine E. Bishop, Jerry Määttä, & David Higgins

contact email:
kbishop@sky.miyazaki-mic.ac.jp

Plants have played key roles in some of the most notable science fiction, from prose to graphic novels and film: John Wyndham’s triffids, the sentient and telepathic flora in Ursula K. Le Guin’s “Vaster than Empires and More Slow,” the gene-hacked crops of Paolo Bacigalupi’s The Windup Girl, the agricultural experiments of Andy Weir’s The Martian, the invasive trees and mechaflowers of Warren Ellis’s Trees, and the galactic greenhouses of Silent Running represent just a few. Plants surround us, sustain us, pique our imaginations, and inhabit our metaphors—and yet in some ways they remain opaque. As Randy Laist writes in Plants and Literature (2013): “Plants seem to inhabit a time-sense, a life cycle, a desire structure, and a morphology that is so utterly alien that it is easy and even tempting to deny their status as animate organisms” (12). The scope of their alienation is as broad as their biodiversity. And yet, literary reflections of plant-life are driven, as are many threads of science fictional inquiry, by the concerns of today.

Throughout human history, plants have supported as well as controlled populations; influenced and revised how we think about ourselves, nature, temporality, and history; fostered technological innovation; and raised new legal issues, such as biomatter copyrights and the borders of non-human personhood. Even though speculations about terrestrial and extraterrestrial plant-life have ever abounded in science fiction, we are only just beginning to understand plant communication, kinship systems, and intelligence. Following the rise of fields such as ethnobotany, agricultural phonobiology, and phytophenomenology; the embrasure of ecology, environmental philosophy, and ecocriticism; and the concomitant increase in concern regarding our fragile and endangered planetary ecosystem, this edited collection is timely, if not overdue.

Science fiction allows us to speculate further on what—or who—plant life may be while exploring how we understand ourselves in relation to the mute (?) sentient (?) world of flora. Thinking about plants differently changes not just our understanding of plants themselves, but also transforms our attitudes toward morality, politics, economics, and cultural life at large. How do the parameters of good and evil, villainy, heroism, and responsibility shift when plant-based life comes into play? How do plant-based characters or foci shift our understandings of institutions, nations, borders, and boundaries? What roles do plants play in our visions of utopian and dystopian futures? How do botanical subjectivities impact our empathic reactions? Our understandings of sentience and agency? How does the inclusion (or exclusion) of plant-based life impact the genre of science fiction?

This volume will be the first to investigate the importance of plants in science fiction. We encourage contributions contending with diverse works from any and all global, national, extranational, or regional positions and all periods. In particular, we welcome essays which consider genre with broader ethical, political, aesthetic, and historical concerns tied to the representation of botanical subjects and subjectivities in science fiction across all media.

Authors are encouraged to consider, but are not constrained to, the following topics and subjects:

Authorship/readership: plant-based authors/readers

Ecocriticism/Green studies: ecology, human/animal/plant interaction and interdependence; anthropomorphism vs. plant subjectivity and agency

Empire: postcolonialism, colonialism, anti-imperialism, pastoral, anti-pastoral

Ethics: individual responsibility, corporate responsibility, global responsibility; carbon trading

Green activism: ‘eco-terrorism’; indigenous lands; environmental legislation; non-human personhood

Habitats: space exploration and colonization; extraplanetary agrarian systems; diasporas, migration, borderlands; heterotopias, utopias, New Edens, dystopias; wilderness vs domesticated

Hybridity: botanical technology; plant-animal / plant-human hybrids; arcologies

Medicine: drugs, poisons, health, ability/disability

Monstrosity: plant-animal / plant-human hybrids; dehumanization; zombification

Narratology: plant perspectives, subjectivities, narrators and/or focalizers

Sentience: consciousness, collective intelligence, ontology, posthumanism

Symbolism: plants as symbols, metaphors, metonymies

Time: alternate time scales; histories; chronologies (“tree rings”)

Value: capitalism, plants and finance; weeds, crops, ornamental

War and peace: weapons, agents of destruction; agents of salvation

Prospective contributors to this edited collection should send an abstract (300-500 words) and brief CV or short biographical statement to Katherine Bishop (kbishop@sky.miyazaki-mic.ac.jp), Jerry Määttä (Jerry.Maatta@littvet.uu.se), and David Higgins (dmhiggin@gmail.com). For full consideration, abstracts are due by 30 April 2017. Completed essays of between 4,000 and 8,000 words will be due by 30 November 2017 for a projected publication date in early 2018.

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Update about Hotel and about Valuables

Hello IAFAers!

At this point, our headquarters hotel, the Orlando Airport Marriott Lakeside, is almost entirely full–only a night here and there remain. 

We are in the process of negotiating for space at the Sheraton Suites next door, the hotel we have used the last few years for this purpose.  For those of you who are new, this hotel is within a stone’s throw of the Marriott.

I ask that if you who have booked a room at the Marriott but do not plan on attending , please cancel your room this week.  We can only hold the block for this week.  If you cancel after Friday, the room will not return to our block, but to the Marriott, which will then charge the rack rate (twice our special rate); plus, we lose the perks IAFA gets when our folks book into our headquarters hotel, such as room nights for our special guests.  

Remember, canceling IAFA registration does NOT cancel your hotel reservation.

If for any reason you need to cancel your hotel room, and we hope you won’t because we want to see you at the conference this year, please let us know, so that we can alert people who have expressed a need that they still need to book a room!

While I have your attention and we are speaking of hotels, please be aware of a feature of staying in any hotel:  LOTS OF PEOPLE HAVE KEYS TO YOUR ROOM.  Housekeeping, Electricians, Plumbers, Sales staff–just to name a few.  For this reason, it is imperative that you not leave anything that someone might consider valuable in your room.  We have had few complaints at the Marriott, but it pays to be vigilant.  The hotel will be happy to keep anything for you in the hotel safe.

If you have any questions, please email me at iafareg@gmail.com.

See you all in March!

Valorie 

“The lesson of history is that no one learns.”

― Steven Erikson, Deadhouse Gates

“We humans do not understand compassion. In each moment of our lives, we betray it. Aye, we know of its worth, yet in knowing we then attach to it a value, we guard the giving of it, believing it must be earned, T’lan Imass. Compassion is priceless in the truest sense of the wold. It must be given freely. In abundance.”

― Steven Erikson, Memories of Ice

“It is blasphemy to separate oneself from the earth and look down on it like a god. It is more than blasphemy; it is dangerous. We can never be gods, after all – but we can become something less than human with frightening ease.”

― N.K. Jemisin, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms

“Tell them they can be great someday, like us. Tell them they belong among us, no matter how we treat them. Tell them they must earn the respect which everyone else receives by default. Them them there is a standard for acceptance; that standard is simply perfection. Kill those who scoff at those contradictions, and tell the rest that the dead deserved annihilation for their weakness and doubt. Then they’ll break themselves trying for what they’ll never achieve”

― N.K. Jemisin, The Fifth Season

“What better way to destroy a civilization, society or a race than to set people into the wild oscillations which follow their turning over their judgment and decision-making faculties to a superhero?”

― Edward James, The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction

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Volunteer at ICFA 38!

Hello Everyone!

The Thirty-Eighth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts is right around the corner! As we approach the warmth and sunshine of Orlando, Florida, I thought I would take this opportunity to let you all know that we are looking for volunteers to help make ICFA 38 a success!

The volunteer positions are as follows with (very) brief descriptions:

AV (Fire Swamp): Set up projectors, troubleshoot presentations

Book Room (Florin): Set up, sell, and pack up the book room

Registration (Cliffs of Insanity): set up and pass out badges and maintain the registration desk

Please use the survey link below to let us know when and where you would like to help.

The rate of compensation for volunteering is $5 ICFA bucks per hour worked, which can be used towards registration or memorabilia. Please note: We can only provide compensation toward future conference expenses. Volunteer hours cannot be used to cover expenses for the current year’s conference, and the hours earned expire in two years.

If you know of other people attending the conference that would like to volunteer and earn ICFA bucks to help them keep coming back, please share the survey with them. If you have questions or concerns, please contact Valorie Ebert, Membership and Registration Coordinator (iafareg AT gmail.com).

Please Note: We need extra volunteers to help load and unload the book room.  If you plan on being at the hotel Monday and/or aren’t leaving until the following Sunday or Monday and would like to help with this important task, please indicate your willingness on the volunteer survey or please contact Valorie Ebert, Membership and Registration Coordinator (iafareg ATgmail.com)..

** Book Room Set Up normally begins at 8:00 a.m. on Monday morning.  They need all the help they can get, so if you are at the conference early on Monday, stop by and lend a hand.

** Book Room Breakdown normally begins at 8:00 a.m. on Sunday morning.  Again, they need all the help they can get, so if you are an early riser, go lend a hand.

You can find the volunteer survey here.

Social Media:

If you are on Facebook you can connect with IAFA here.  In addition, if you are a student you can also join the Student Caucus Facebook page here.

Please follow us on Twitter here!

If you have questions or concerns, please contact Valorie Ebert, Membership and Registration Coordinator (iafareg AT gmail.com). We look forward to seeing you in March!

Regards,

Valorie

“The lesson of history is that no one learns.”

― Steven Erikson, Deadhouse Gates

“We humans do not understand compassion. In each moment of our lives, we betray it. Aye, we know of its worth, yet in knowing we then attach to it a value, we guard the giving of it, believing it must be earned, T’lan Imass. Compassion is priceless in the truest sense of the wold. It must be given freely. In abundance.”

― Steven Erikson, Memories of Ice

“It is blasphemy to separate oneself from the earth and look down on it like a god. It is more than blasphemy; it is dangerous. We can never be gods, after all – but we can become something less than human with frightening ease.”

― N.K. Jemisin, The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms

“Tell them they can be great someday, like us. Tell them they belong among us, no matter how we treat them. Tell them they must earn the respect which everyone else receives by default. Them them there is a standard for acceptance; that standard is simply perfection. Kill those who scoff at those contradictions, and tell the rest that the dead deserved annihilation for their weakness and doubt. Then they’ll break themselves trying for what they’ll never achieve”

― N.K. Jemisin, The Fifth Season

“What better way to destroy a civilization, society or a race than to set people into the wild oscillations which follow their turning over their judgment and decision-making faculties to a superhero?”

― Edward James, The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction

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